The awakening feminism essay

According to the announcement, “Vaughn Dance Company’s adaptation of The Awakening traces the heroine’s emotional journey, exploring her relationships with friends, lovers, and the sea. Andrew York’s music brings alive the emotional arc of this story with a score that includes new, unpublished pieces and a live performance by York. Making its mark with sensual shapes and undulating movement, Jennifer Vaughn’s choreography is a palpable embodiment of music that captivates broader audiences and dance aficionados alike.”

This trial is very different, about a decidedly prosaic and earthbound bit of leering that any woman can recognise. In taking on the case, Swift has made a truly universal political statement, and one that many people have been clamouring for. She has 85m Twitter followers, another 102m on Instagram, and enough clout that one picture of an inflatable swan can cause an uptick in Primark revenues . But she has kept these very public channels apolitical. She stayed quiet during the Trump-Clinton election and over the upheavals surrounding Black Lives Matter , and eroded her black fanbase as a result of the latter. She tweeted about the Women’s March in January, but was criticised for not attending.

{Seneca Falls Declaration (1848)} The "Declaration" and the entire feminist movement brought out into the open the rights which women were denied including; women had no rights to vote, married women had no property rights, wives became the legal property of their husbands, the husband exercised legal power over their wives to the extent that they could imprison or beat their wives, women were not allowed to enter into most professions such as medicine or law, and no college or university would accept a woman as a student...
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On Chopin's support of slavery:
It's important not to underestimate the influence of her Catholicism which was quite comfortable with the idea, in fact promoted the idea that every human person could be excellent, valuable in the eyes of God, without occupying the same social situation or standing, without playing the same social role. This is a perspective that would say that men and women can be equally valuable without being equal, in the sense of being identical and doing these same things. So I think she was very comfortable with difference in social station, that she did not spend her life feeling that it was an acute injustice that there were social classes, for example. So that's part of the general sensibility. More directly to the point . . her [pro-slavery views and] support for the Confederacy, is not ever necessarily exactly the same thing as racism. It is entirely possible to favor slavery as a form of social organization and yet to believe that all human creatures, persons, are equally valuable. At the extreme of . . the pro-slavery theorists argue that slavery itself was intrinsically good and that if there weren't Blacks to enslave then whites would have to be enslaved. That the virtue of it . . lay in the nature of the social system which made capital responsible for labor which established a personal relation between the well-to-do and working people, so that no one can protest the argument. At this point, I'm not defending it. But what I'm trying to underscore is that there is no contradiction necessarily between her having been sympathetic to to the Confederacy and her being arguably much more sympathetic to Black characters, much more taking them as human beings, than many more "egalitarian" northern writers would be.

The awakening feminism essay

the awakening feminism essay

On Chopin's support of slavery:
It's important not to underestimate the influence of her Catholicism which was quite comfortable with the idea, in fact promoted the idea that every human person could be excellent, valuable in the eyes of God, without occupying the same social situation or standing, without playing the same social role. This is a perspective that would say that men and women can be equally valuable without being equal, in the sense of being identical and doing these same things. So I think she was very comfortable with difference in social station, that she did not spend her life feeling that it was an acute injustice that there were social classes, for example. So that's part of the general sensibility. More directly to the point . . . her [pro-slavery views and] support for the Confederacy, is not ever necessarily exactly the same thing as racism. It is entirely possible to favor slavery as a form of social organization and yet to believe that all human creatures, persons, are equally valuable. At the extreme of . . . the pro-slavery theorists argue that slavery itself was intrinsically good and that if there weren't Blacks to enslave then whites would have to be enslaved. That the virtue of it . . . lay in the nature of the social system which made capital responsible for labor which established a personal relation between the well-to-do and working people, so that no one can protest the argument. At this point, I'm not defending it. But what I'm trying to underscore is that there is no contradiction necessarily between her having been sympathetic to to the Confederacy and her being arguably much more sympathetic to Black characters, much more taking them as human beings, than many more "egalitarian" northern writers would be.

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