Fukuyama end of history essay summary

We are now condemned to live in exciting times. Boredom is, quite clearly, underrated. At the same time, I must confess that as Trump’s victory settled, my despair was coupled with a rush of blood to the head. I felt my fear, including for my family , giving me a sense of purpose. I at least knew what I believed in and what I hoped America could still become. And, in one way or another, even if we don’t quite consciously want it, it’s something we all apparently need — something, whatever it is, to fight for. Now Americans on both sides of the ever-widening divide will have it.

James A. Haley is a senior fellow at the Centre for International Governance Innovation and a public policy fellow at the Canada Institute, Woodrow Wilson Center for International Scholars, in Washington, . Follow us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter Twitter Facebook Google+ Share LinkedIn Reddit Email
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  1. Francis Fukuyama is/was an idiot.

    Fukuyama end of history essay summary

    fukuyama end of history essay summary

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