Essay about rabbit proof fence

With this in mind, the affective dimensions of Rabbit-Proof Fence , even if packaged for mass-market appeal, can also be seen as generative of new readings, openings and becomings. To read affect as the delimited outpouring of emotions or feelings alone ignores the possibilities for energy release that can elaborate ways of being in the world that are relational and fallible in contact with 'those things from outside, that surprise, that disturb, that introduce unpredictability' (Hawkins and Muecke xiv). Affect involves more than emotions or feeling. As a force affect gives rise to feeling, but also to acts of (re)cognition in multiple, contradictory and unmappable ways. The experience of affect is, according to Gay Hawkins and Stephen Muecke, 'to be in the world, to participate in it, to be moved by it' (xiv) without predetermination and, importantly, with a deliberate self-reflexivity, beyond vicarious identification. An ecological view of relations articulates this process and, in so doing, diffuses the certainty and linearity claimed to constrain the commodity chain.

Olsen does not say that Molly's story is a story of the Stolen Generations, possibly because it was too obvious or possibly because it tends to expose the limits of what we might call the "empathetic collapse" of Molly's story into her own story.

Empathy is indeed the key premise of a film like Rabbit-Proof Fence . With its origins in late nineteenth-century German idealist aesthetics, empathy ("Einfülung", literally in-feeling, Malgrave and Ikonomou, 22) now generates an optimistic connotative field that reached its public apogee in Bill Clinton's refrain: "I feel your pain". It is reasonable to imagine that most who will see the film would not have had direct experience of being forcibly removed from their parents or having their children forcibly removed from them. In the place of this, the film (like many others) asks its audience to make that imaginative leap. Not all films ask this question explicitly, though the controversial poster for the North American release of Rabbit-Proof Fence does just this, reading: "What if the government kidnapped your daughter?" (Adnum 2002). The poster has been doubly controversial, attracting both right-wing criticism as "sensationalising, misleading and grossly distorting" (Adnum 2002), as well as raising left-wing eyebrows because the central image of Molly carrying Daisy has been digitally removed – lost, as it were, in the cultural translation. The problem, of course, is one of a double-audience; a relatively informed domestic audience and a relatively uniformed international audience. (One American reviewer described the film as based on a book by Doris Pilkington and Nugi Garimara.) The solution, on the face of it, is to speak in a universalising language of emotions. This is certainly the line taken consistently in the publicity surrounding the film and is prominent in the reactions and reviews. Noyce describes his experience of reading the script as follows:

The hoax was uncovered on 4 December. Thomas Onslow, 2nd Baron Onslow , had begun an investigation of his own and discovered that for the past month Toft's husband, Joshua, had been buying young rabbits. Convinced he had enough evidence to proceed, in a letter to physician Sir Hans Sloane he wrote that the affair had "almost alarmed England" and that he would soon publish his findings. [3] [35] The same day, Thomas Howard, a porter at the bagnio, confessed to Justice of the Peace Sir Thomas Clarges that he had been bribed by Toft's sister-in-law, Margaret, to sneak a rabbit into Toft's chamber. When arrested and questioned Mary denied the accusation, while Margaret, under Douglas's interrogation, claimed that she had obtained the rabbit for eating only. [36]

The director, Phillip Noyce made Rabbit Proof Fence to try and illustrate the shear enormity of the oppression suffered by aboriginal families at the hands of white Australian politicians and the government. The Australian administrators passed a policy that forced pure blooded, half castes and quarter castes Aboriginal children to be taken from their families and their land to be bred and mixed into the white Australian community. The government believed that this was in the Aboriginals best interest but their motive was to eventually eliminate Aboriginal blood to promote a white Australia. This policy is now referred to as the ‘Stolen Generation’. The pain and suffering the Aborigines experienced, the oppression and heart-break only ceased in 1970, when Australia finally realized what they have done and voted to abolish the White Australia policy in 1967. Phillip Noyce’s film, Rabbit Proof Fence reminded and informed the world how inhumane and ignorant the Australian administrative was. Without a doubt Aboriginals have faced harsh treatment, grief and sadness and Noyce’s film showed us exactly this.

Essay about rabbit proof fence

essay about rabbit proof fence

The director, Phillip Noyce made Rabbit Proof Fence to try and illustrate the shear enormity of the oppression suffered by aboriginal families at the hands of white Australian politicians and the government. The Australian administrators passed a policy that forced pure blooded, half castes and quarter castes Aboriginal children to be taken from their families and their land to be bred and mixed into the white Australian community. The government believed that this was in the Aboriginals best interest but their motive was to eventually eliminate Aboriginal blood to promote a white Australia. This policy is now referred to as the ‘Stolen Generation’. The pain and suffering the Aborigines experienced, the oppression and heart-break only ceased in 1970, when Australia finally realized what they have done and voted to abolish the White Australia policy in 1967. Phillip Noyce’s film, Rabbit Proof Fence reminded and informed the world how inhumane and ignorant the Australian administrative was. Without a doubt Aboriginals have faced harsh treatment, grief and sadness and Noyce’s film showed us exactly this.

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